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In the spirit of old times...

I'm feelin' alright. I have also noted in the past that feelin' fine is a problem - it makes lateral thinking difficult. Only when I am tired and mentally fatigued do I get to think about the really great stuff.

Now, if you're like me, you would immediately wonder why, likely jumping at the analogue to drugs and drunkeness; artificially induced sophistication. Really, though, the effects are an analogue, but the causes are probably completely different. Booze 'n drugs are useful by either starving the brain of oxygen, or by shutting down certain areas. Sleep deprivation seems to cause data to back up, queuing all new input until earlier data is processed. The trick is understanding that new data can jump the queue, but that the mind becomes preoccupied with sorting and processing the data already there. Thus is the reason introspection and meditation is so much easier when behind on sleep.

Of course, the even greater trick is knowing when the mind is panicing or cascading. Taken too far, one becomes paranoid delusional, frantically sorting data using fast but sloppy methods, and thus finding patterns that are ineffectual (think conspiracy theory). Thinking back, I spend a huge amount of my time varifying the validity of my reasonings and thought patterns. It's such a strong reflex that I tend to be rational even when exhausted or in highly stressful situations.

Compare this to when I'm well rested, where I tend to think on impulse - real fast data processing, but it lacks the usual slowdown from backlogged information. Listen to me, I consider my usual thoughts slow and methodical because I had such lousy sleeping habits. Honestly, I miss it; I could take my time processing things. Stuff flys through to fast for conscious regulating; at this point, I run on reflex - I can only track the logic in retrospect.

But enough now, time for more quantum electrodynamics. Sweet science. I'm tired just right for grinding through some symbolic math.

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